The Killing Fields 2


Landing in Phnom Penh, the heat and humidity hit me like a wall. I have gone through all four seasons over the last few weeks and I have arrived in a hot and sticky summer once again.

I have a little more time in Cambodia, so my plan was to move a little slower to let my body have a rest after the 18 hour days over the last 2 weeks.

Phnom Penh has a number of things that I wanted to check out, mostly to do with the Genocide that happened here just over 30 years ago. My first stop was the Killing Fields at Choeung Ek. This remembrance monument and park is about 15 kilometres from the centre of the city. I hired a Tuk Tuk for the afternoon to take me to all of the spots I wanted to see for about $20 USD.

Arriving at the park, I was immediately shown a video that described what happened here. At this very location, there were over 20,000 people slaughtered by the communists. Across the country, over 3 million people were murdered. It was chilling walking through the areas where the mass graves were excavated. There is a 40 metre concrete remembrance monument that holds the bones, sculls and clothing of those that were murdered here. The thing that upset me the most was the killing tree that was used by the executioners to beat infants and babies to death with.

After leaving noticeably distraught, I asked my driver to take me around to explore and photograph local life. I needed a short break before heading to S.21, the interrogation centre and prison. Prisoners were interrogated and tortured here before being sent to the killing fields.

S.21 was not altered or touched to preserve the look and feel of what went on here. The iron beds, chains and shackles are still in the prison cells and a lot of the interrogation and execution devices are on display throughout the prison. Photographs of broken and lifeless bodies were very upsetting to both me and others that were visiting. The uncensored and raw images are on display to show people the evil that existed here, only a short time ago.

After this long day of history, I walked the shore of the river and found a restaurant to enjoy a traditional Cambodian dinner of fish, fresh veggies and rice served in a coconut shell. My next stop is Siem Reap where I will be checking off another bucket list item.

Phnom Penh Central Market

Phnom Penh Central Market

Phnom Penh

Phnom Penh

The Genocidal Monument of Choeung Ek

The Genocidal Monument of Choeung Ek

The Genocidal Monument of Choeung Ek

The Genocidal Monument of Choeung Ek

The Killing Fields of Choeung Ek

The Killing Fields of Choeung Ek

The Killing Fields and Mass Graves of Choeung Ek

The Killing Fields and Mass Graves of Choeung Ek

The Mass Graves of Choeung Ek

The Mass Graves of Choeung Ek

Exploring Phnom Penh

Exploring Phnom Penh

Locals

Locals

Lunchtime

Lunchtime

Family Road Trip

Family Road Trip

S.21 Prison

S.21 Prison

S.21 Interrogation Chamber

S.21 Interrogation Chamber

Genocide Museum

Genocide Museum

Shackles, Cells and Passages of the Prison

Shackles, Cells and Passages of the Prison

S.21 Prison

S.21 Prison

S.21 Prison

S.21 Prison

Dinner by the Tonle Sap River

Dinner by the Tonle Sap River

Dinner in a Coconut Shell and a cold Cambodian beer

Dinner in a Coconut Shell and a cold Cambodian beer


About Andrew Pateras

Andrew has lived in the GTA all his life and a good portion of his adult life has been devoted to sales. He studied Business Information Systems Management at Ryerson University. From there, he worked in sales for tier one organizations such as Hewlett Packard, Epson and Intel. Then as North American Sales Manager for GAP Adventures, he gained even more experience in negotiation and client service. Andrew has been a licensed real estate sales person since 2006. In 2007, Andrew also began a new venture in professional photography. Over the next number of years, he travelled on assignment all over the world. This is why he is meticulous when it comes to your marketing images! To say Andrew's travel and photography experience is extensive would definitely be an understatement. He has journeyed to remote and exotic locations in 48 countries on all six continents in search of adventure and authentic cultural experiences. Whether it is diving with great white sharks in South Africa, in a cage with Bengal tigers in northern Thailand or perched atop a land cruiser, photographing rhinos and lions in the Serengeti, he has likely photographed any holiday experience you can imagine. In 2015, Andrew earned the Directors Platinum award from Royal LePage for outstanding sales performance. Andrew's commitment as your real estate professional is to provide you with the specialized real estate service you deserve. Whether you're buying or selling, contact him with any questions that you may have. His promise to you is that your experience will be both stress-free and enjoyable. His focus is always YOU and the results you can expect from him.


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2 thoughts on “The Killing Fields

  • Claudia

    It looks like you had breakfast at the same cafe in Phnom Penh… I can see the corner building I was staring at, back in Nov.. The Killing Fields photos are stil sending chills down my spine… I refused to take pictures there.
    I love you pics… enjoy the rest of your trip! :)